Tagged: “Lyme disease prevention month”

MAY- LYME DISEASE PREVENTION MONTH

MAY- LYME DISEASE PREVENTION MONTH

LYME DISEASE PREVENTION MONTH

Putnam County veterinarians have noticed a growing number of Lyme positive dogs within the county and it is time for everyone to become educated on this disease and learn how to prevent it from possibly happening to your family pet(s).
Lyme disease is carried and transmitted primarily by the tiny black- legged tick known as the deer tick. These types of ticks are found in forests or grassy, wooded, marshy areas near rivers, lakes and oceans. Animals may be bitten by deer ticks during outdoor activities such as hiking or camping, or even while spending time in their backyards.

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO FOR YOUR PET:
• Use reliable tick-preventive products. Speak with your veterinarian about what tick preventive product is right for your pet.
• Work with your veterinarian to decide whether to vaccinate your dog against Lyme disease. Your veterinarian’s advice may depend on where you live, your pet’s lifestyle and overall health, and other factors.
• When possible, avoid areas where ticks might be found. These include tall grasses, marshes and wooded areas.
• Check for ticks on both yourself and your animals once indoors.
• Clear shrubbery next to homes.
• Keep lawns well maintained.

If your animal is Lyme negative, consider getting the Lyme disease vaccines that are available for dogs; they aren’t necessarily recommended for every dog, but it is important for you to discuss your options with a veterinarian.
If your veterinarian does recommend that your dog be vaccinated against Lyme disease, the typical protocol will involve an initial vaccination followed by a booster 2-4 weeks later and annual boosters

Pets infected with Lyme disease may not show any signs for 2-5 months.
After that time, typical symptoms include:
• Fever
• Loss of appetite
• Lameness
• Joint swelling
• Decreased activity

Pets diagnosed with Lyme disease can still live long and healthy lives as long as they are treated.

(Source: https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/lyme-disease.aspx)